Would Canadians enjoy more freedom with the American constitution?

Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau meets Britain's Queen Elizabeth II during a private audience at Buckingham Palace, London.

At first, it might seem outrageous to even consider — perhaps even preposterous — but contemplate for a moment a plausible (albeit far-fetched) scenario of geopolitics: Imagine that Canada’s thirteen provinces joined the United States of America as thirteen sovereign self-governing States of the Union with full Congressional representation, but newly devoid of the monarchial legal construction of ‘The Crown’.

Supporters of the concept — dubbed a proverbial ‘invasion’ — would require referendums in each province with constitutional conventions in each province soon to follow.

Canadians don’t enjoy the equivalent of the Bill of Rights or the legal concept that power emanates from the people.  Freedom of speech, a right to bear to arms, and many mechanisms of the constitutional separation of powers are absent from Canadian law.  The political enlightenment that occurred in the United States and France in the late 18th century never occurred among Canada’s governing class, perhaps for lack of revolutionaries, placated by the patronage that flows from loyalty to the Crown.

Economists predict that Canada’s private sector economy would boom in the absence of its federal sales tax, federal carbon pricing, and other heavy-tax schemes. Lower taxes coupled with newly seamless access to the American marketplace could greatly accelerate the economic growth of Canada’s provinces, giving Canadian manufacturers extraordinary new access to the largest economy in the world.  It would also give Canadian consumers access to much cheaper consumer goods.

It’s presumed that Canada’s automobile and steel industries would particularly benefit. While Canada’s major banks would face new competition, they are well-capitalized and would be positioned strongly for growth in the much larger American marketplace.

Critics would argue that Canada’s tradition of universal single-payer healthcare would make such a political union unworkable.  But the American constitutional construct of States’ Rights would empower Provinces to maintain their universal healthcare systems, without Ottawa acting as a middle-man.

Increasingly, Canada’s Conservatives are warming to the idea of North American economic and political integration. In part, it’s due to the Liberal Party of Canada’s seemingly beholden posture to Chinese institutions that act as intermediaries to the Communist Party of China.  For Canada’s western region, an electorate that is resentful of Ottawa may very well prefer to play their hand in Washington.

Under American law, the indigenous governments of Canada (who are currently governed under the harshly assimilative, economically-prohibitive, and expropriative legal constructs of Canada’s Indian Act) would enjoy the recognition of their inherent sovereignty, which has long been enshrined in the American jurisprudence.  That’s no small distinction for Canada’s indigenous people, whose assertions of sovereignty Canada has long denied.

Self-determination and self-government have driven catalytic economic and quality of life improvements in indigenous communities in the United States since the Nixon administration’s reversal of assimilative tribal termination policies, a fact that is made particularly apparent when contrasted with the lack of progress made by Canada’s First Nations governments in recent decades, which act as agencies of Canada’s federal government.

The United States Constitution has a much higher regard for Indian Treaties than the Canadian Courts — specifically recognizing Treaties as the Supreme Law of the Land. Canada has a more narrow construction of aboriginal treaty rights.

7 Comments

  1. When pigs fly. This article is just idle day-dreamig. You don’t understand the tunnel vision of most Canadians. Canadians are not fighters – they do not value their freedom. Whatever Ottawa throws at them, they meekly accept.

    • As canadian i can only say a thing, I’m not happy with it but you’re absolutly right!! Especially in the province of Quebec ! 😡

      My english is not perfect, sorry

  2. Some of us would jump at the chance to called American. I can’t believe what my Canada has become in just 5 short years. I used to fly my Canadian flag as proudly as any US citizen flew the Stars and Stripes.

    • Sorry this opinion piece is garbage based on lies. Most important is that Canada has its version of the bill of rights that often goes farther to protect the individual. And some collective rights. We have our version of the equal rights amendment to protect women that the USA never passed. Our public education is much stronger in average as shown by consistent International testing. Your sales taxes are not that much different than ours. The carbon tax includes a rebate to all but the wealthiest families. Even where USA income taxes are lower, once you add health care premiums in the USA, most likely pay more overall for insurance that still has copays and maximums. Indigenous sovereignty and treaties receive protection in Canadian law and some first nations we call them do well. We have good access to the US market now with the trade ageement. Covid has shown the weaknesses in USA health care and governance. We love being your neighbours most of the time. Good luck

  3. As much as I am envious of the US Constitution and the rights that emanate from it we see that even a document as powerful as that can be subdued if there is enough power and money dedicated to destroying it, between Silicon Valley and the Deep State we see they are immanently poised to defraud the American people of their right to elect their President, and not just him but almost every elected position is corrupted by their money and control over information.
    So in short I’ll still fight to free Canada of the Trudeau stain and then we can work on improving our own constitution.

  4. Who wrote this piece of garbage? Obviously a right wing Republican who really worships money, and not the benefits to the citizens.
    The writer is totally untutored in Canadian law and politics, and does not have a grasp of what motivates Canadians.
    To some, the Queen may seem an outdated and archaic institution, but this is to be blind of its benefits.
    In particular, the Queen acts as a rallying point and a bulwark against creeping Americanism and any attempts at a takeover.
    Canadians are well aware of the seven attempts of the US to invade Canada, in the period 1775 to 1840s. Americans have been repulsed each time.
    The US military attempts of the past have been replaced by US economic hegemony, which uses golden handcuffs as a means to an end.
    Canadians remain wary of the American embrace.
    O Canada, we stand on guard for thee!

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