Opinion

ABRAMS: Conservatives should not give up on American education

BY SAMUEL ABRAMS Surveys and reports showing that only small numbers of conservatives and Republicans believe higher education has a positive effect on the country regularly make national news. The explicit rationale for these sentiments is not entirely clear, but there are numerous possible

Foreign Policy

Swedish Navy asks the public to be on the lookout

BY ELISABETH BRAW Anyone who has ever visited London has seen the posters and heard the announcements on Tube stations instructing people to “see it, say it, sorted.” The public awareness campaign encouraging people to report odd behavior to the

Foreign Policy

Putin, Ukraine, and Biden

BY LEON ARON Whether or not Russian troops cross the Ukrainian border to start yet another invasion of Ukraine, the reasons for Russia’s massing troops on the Russian side of the line fall into two categories. The first, permanent and

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Facebook’s Supreme Court victory will rein in class actions

BY DANIEL LYONS Earlier this month, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Facebook’s texts alerting customers of suspicious account activity did not violate the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), a 1991 anti-robocall statute. Some argue that the decision could prompt a

Foreign Policy

Biden avenges Russian grayzone aggression

BY ELISABETH BRAW In the grayzone between war and peace, the targeted country always struggles with the dilemma of when and how to respond to aggression. In the United States, neither the Obama administration nor the Trump administration managed to

Opinion

HOWELL: When satellite chickens come home to terrestrial roosts

By Bronwyn Howell For several reasons, 1990s New Zealand was a natural test bed for the deployment of nascent broadband technologies and different business models for their commercialization: It is geographically contained in a comparatively small land area, has a

State Budget

Cuomo creates $2 billion fund for those living in New York illegally

Since Democrats’ $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan (ARP) was enacted in February, states have been busy designing ways to spend their share of the $350 billion in one-time federal “state and local aid” provided by that legislation. One of the most novel may be

National Headlines

America’s missing $11 trillion

BY JAMES PETHOKOUKIS Increasing worker productivity is critical to raising living standards over the long run. But what does that mean, exactly? Consider this: If the American economy had been able to maintain the rapid productivity growth experienced in the

Opinion

JAMISON: Journalism preservation is based on misinformation

BY MARK JAMISON According to members of Congress, American journalism is on the ropes. “Newspapers are locked in a life-or-death struggle with tech giants,” said Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA). “We have seen thousands of news organizations crushed by the monopolistic power

Commerce

The zero-sum administration’s corporate tax plan

BY PAUL H. KUPIEC Newly-elected administrations try to lay the groundwork for their legacy in the first 100-days in office. During their “honeymoon” period, they introduce landmark legislation and issue executive orders to address existential economic or national security concerns,

Commerce

Remote work: Will country roads really take you home?

BY BRENT ORRELL That’s the question raised by a new incentive program designed to draw workers freed from geography by remote-work options to live in the state of West Virginia. Ascend West Virginia is offering $12,000 and other perks as incentives to draw

National Headlines

Securing children online: Balance caution with opportunity

BY SHANE TEWS In March, it was reported that Facebook had plans to develop a new Instagram product for children under the age of 13. Facebook follows the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act regulations, which require users to be at

Technology

Quantum computing: A national security primer

BY KLON KITCHEN Quantum computing is a rapidly advancing field of computer science that harnesses the mind-bending dynamics of quantum physics—the behavior of the universe’s smallest particles—to produce computers with vast new capabilities.1 The physics behind quantum computing are immensely complex,

Commerce

Does the US need a national paid leave law after the pandemic?

BY ANGELA RACHIDI When the coronavirus pandemic hit American shores in early 2020, questions emerged over how employers and employees would handle the anticipated need for workers to take time away for illness or to care for family members. Without a national paid leave law,

Commerce

New Senate plan would make pandemic unemployment benefits permanent

BY MATT WEIDINGER The Washington Post reports President Joe Biden’s next trillion-dollar spending plan “is expected to devote hundreds of billions of dollars to new programs,” including “$225 billion for child-care funding; $225 billion for paid family and medical leave; $200 billion

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Niagara Falls has infrastructure needs too, Senator Kennedy

The massive new infrastructure bill proposed by President Joe Biden makes more than two trillion dollars available to remake the American infrastructure system — and Western New York stands to be appropriated billions.  The federal government will fund 80% of