Pridgen passes three resolutions — including Cariol’s Law — forcing Brown to take action against police brutality

Police officers and activists have been calling Mayor Byron Brown's resignation, following his mishandling of protests in the aftermath of George Floyd's tragic death.

Just days after Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown retreated on previous calls for the termination of two police officers who shoved Martin Gugino to the ground and broader calls for police reform, Council President Darius Pridgen is demanding that the administration take a slew of actions to reign in a notoriously undisciplined police department.

Pridgen is expected to pass three Buffalo Common Council resolutions aiming to combat police brutality and institutionalized racism.  The first resolution asks Mayor Brown to enforce the City’s “Duty to Intervene” policy, requiring officers to protect citizens from the unnecessary use of force committed by fellow officers.

That law has been dubbed “Cariole’s Law”, after former African American police officer Cariol Holloman-Horne, who was terminated just days short of receiving her 20-year pension, after she intervened to stop the use of excessive force by a white police officer who was later terminated in another excessive force case.

“We do have a policy, but we want to make sure that all police officers know that policy and know that they are to assist in situations. We also want that policy to be looked at, to be amended as needed and that it be reported back to the Council and that every police officer would be trained again on the duty to intervene within the next 30 days,” Pridgen is reported as saying during a Council meeting Monday.

The second resolution will establish a task force of representatives from the Council’s Police Oversight Committee and other City departments to craft a reform agenda forward.

The third resolution asks the New York State Attorney General’s Office to investigate attendance records of Horne to determine how many days of work Horne needs to qualify for a pension — presumably in preparation for a settlement agreement with Horne.

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Former police officer Cariol Holloman Horne.

12 Comments

    • YOU GO GIRL YOU DID WHAT THEY SHOULD’VE DONE IN GEORGE FLOYDS DEATH GOD WILL DEAL HANDEL THUS MATTER REGARNING YOU & THIS UNJUST MATTER KEEP THE FAITH & IF I COULD CLICK MY HEELS 3 TIMES YOU WOULD ALREADY BEEN MADE WHOLE .& GIVEN A BADGE OF GOOD HUMANITY .ILL KEEP YOU IN PRAYER AMEN GOD IS GREAT!!

  1. This officer is suffering today after wrongfully stopping acts of murder pay her pension enact her law and add the original officer to a review of his pass miscond and the city pay the judgement against the wrongful decision since it can’t be dismissed

    • TO VELMA BERRY, FIRST I LOVE YOUR LITTLE ICON. SECOND, ALL YOUR POINTS ARE GOOD, BUT ONE THING THAT HAS CHANGED BRINGING SOME PROGRESS ON THESE KILLINGS. THE CITIES THEMSELVES HAVE COME UNDER FIRE. THEY ARE BEING SUED, VOTED OUT OF OFFICE, AND FACING INTERNATIONAL NEWS COVERAGE, THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE MARCHING IN THE STREETS. IT IS THE TOP OF THE FOOD CHAIN THAT IS THE CENTER OF THIS. GOD BLESS OFFICER HORNE.

  2. What she did was courageous and selfless. May God continue to bless her life for doing the right thing. If the other officers in the George Floyd’s murder had been half as courageous or humane as she was, this man would still be alive today to celebrate fathers day with his daughter. She deserves her pension and Cariol’s law needs to be enacted.

  3. Thanking God that change is finally here on Officer Horne’s behalf and also praying for full restitution that she’s is due, in addition to “pain and suffering” both she and her children endured as a result of the unsympathetic acts of her colleague and the police department as well.

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